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Link: Genes and human disease

Most diseases involve many genes in complex interactions, in addition to environmental influences. An individual may not be born with a disease but may be at high risk of acquiring it. This is called as genetic predisposition or susceptibility. The genetic susceptibility to a particular disease due to the presence of one or more gene mutations, and/or a combination of alleles need not necessarily be abnormal.

This page talks about “genetic predisposition” to common diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and asthma, and provides resources to finding out more about genes and these diseases.

© World Health Organisation 2015

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: What does it mean to have a genetic predisposition to a disease?

A genetic predisposition (sometimes also called genetic susceptibility) is an increased likelihood of developing a particular disease based on a person’s genetic makeup. A genetic predisposition results from specific genetic variations that are often inherited from a parent. These genetic changes contribute to the development of a disease but do not directly cause it. Some people with a predisposing genetic variation will never get the disease while others will, even within the same family.

The full text can be found at nih.gov.

© U.S. National Library of Medicine 25th May, 2015

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Overview of the Cranial Nerves

Twelve pairs of nerves—the cranial nerves—lead directly from the brain to various parts of the head, neck, and trunk. Some of the cranial nerves are involved in the special senses (such as seeing, hearing, and taste), and others control muscles in the face or regulate glands. The nerves are named and numbered (according to their location, from the front of the brain to the back).

The full Merc Manuals “Consumer Version” can be found at http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/brain-spinal-cord-and-nerve-disorders/cranial-nerve-disorders/overview-of-the-cranial-nerves.

Copyright © Merc Manuals

This link was posted on 4th November, 2014 by J.J. to the thread https://www.facebook.com/groups/251477975360/permalink/10154754360385361/.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: How to find the best Medicare drug plan What you need to know about Part D

If you do not have a Medicare Advantage plan that includes Part D drug coverage, you must sign up for it separately.

This Consumer Reports article demystifies Medicare Part D coverage for consumers. The full text can be found at http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/2014/10/best-medicare-drug-plans/index.htm.

Copyright © Consumer Reports October 2014

This link was posted on 27th October by G.D. to this thread – https://www.facebook.com/groups/251477975360/permalink/10154712512285361/.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Can you Walk and Chew Gum at the Same Time?

Ever heard the expression « bet you can’t walk and chew gum at the same time? » I am not sure I really appreciated the full extent of its meaning until just last week.

At the 3rd International Congress on Gait and Mental Function in Washington DC in February, a series of new research studies were unveiled. One such study, described by Prof. Jeffrey M. Hausdorff , Director of Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, was on the topic of dual-tasking while waking. That is, walking and doing one other thing at the same time – like talking, observing the trees and flowers or other tasks that require a little attention.

Posted on by T.A.O. on 30th August 2014 to the tread https://www.facebook.com/groups/251477975360/permalink/10154491879730361/.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Assessment of altered mental status

Altered mental status (AMS) is a general term used to describe various disorders of mental functioning that can range from slight confusion to coma. [1] Given the vagueness of the term, it is imperative to understand its key components before considering a differential diagnosis. Fundamentally, mental status is a combination of the patient’s level of consciousness (i.e., attentiveness) and cognition (i.e., mental processes or thoughts); patients may have disorders of one or both. [2] For example, patients with meningitis may have impaired consciousness (i.e., altered sensorium, decreased attentiveness) with intact cognition, whereas patients with dementia may have a normal level of consciousness with impaired cognition. However, more frequently, patients exhibit altered levels of consciousness plus cognition: for example, with delirium, a relatively common and sometimes fatal cause of AMS.

This article discusses “altered mental status” which is often listed as a symptom of encephalopathy. The full article can be found at http://bestpractice.bmj.com/best-practice/monograph/843.html.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Video: Mild Cognitive Impairment – Ten Years Later

You can read the full test of the study he talks about at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3081688/.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Video: CSF presents “PANDAS, Paraneoplastic Limbic Encephalitis & Other Autoimmune Syndromes”

Posted by T.A.O. on 21st April, 2015.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: What is Lupus?

What is lupus?

Lupus is a chronic, autoimmune disease that can damage any part of the body (skin, joints, and/or organs inside the body). Chronic means that the signs and symptoms tend to last longer than six weeks and often for many years.

In lupus, something goes wrong with your immune system, which is the part of the body that fights off viruses, bacteria, and germs (“foreign invaders,” like the flu). Normally our immune system produces proteins called antibodies that protect the body from these invaders. Autoimmune means your immune system cannot tell the difference between these foreign invaders and your body’s healthy tissues (“auto” means “self”) and creates autoantibodies that attack and destroy healthy tissue. These autoantibodies cause inflammation, pain, and damage in various parts of the body.

The full article can be found at http://www.lupus.org/answers/entry/what-is-lupus.  The article was posted to comments on 24th April, 2015 by G.D.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Video: What Is a Partial Seizure? | Epilepsy

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.