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Auto-Immune

Auto-Immune: relating to disease caused by antibodies or lymphocytes produced against substances naturally present in the body.

Video: RHR: Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) as a Treatment for Autoimmune Disease

An excellent and informative video on LDN therapy in autoimmune diseases.



This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: LDN Research Trust

The primary aim of the Trust is to initiate Clinical Trials of Low Dose Naltrexone, help and support those who have a condition where LDN could be of benefit obtain a prescription around the world.

LDN (low dose naltrexone) therapy can be beneficial in many autoimmune conditions including Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. For more information about this therapy and information you can share with your Primary Care Physician or General Practitioner, please visit http://www.ldnresearchtrust.org/.

You can also find a link to their info sheet on LDN therapy at http://www.ldnresearchtrust.org/sites/default/files/2016.pdf.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Autoimmune Dementia Study

Dr Sean Pittock, MD, a consultant in the Division of MS and Autoimmune Neurology at the Mayo Clinic discusses the findings of a recent study investigating the clinical predictors of immunotherapy responsiveness in patients with presumed Autoimmune Dementia. Available at:http://tinyurl.com/cq95c85

This video from Mayo Proceedings, “the world’s fourth largest medical journal”. Dr. Sean Pittock speaks more to this topic in another Mayo Labratories video on youtube.com.

This video link was posted to comments by G.D. on a post to Autoimmune Encephalitis (All types including Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy) on 2nd June, 2015.

 


 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Psychiatric Presentations of Autoimmune Encephalopathies

While a biological basis for numerous psychiatric illnesses has become increasingly appreciated, few mechanistic hypotheses have gripped psychiatric researchers as strongly as an autoimmune basis for behavioral abnormalities.

The full article from Psychiatric Times can be found at http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/neuropsychiatry/psychiatric-presentations-autoimmune-encephalopathies.

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Woman Falls Suddenly Ill After Developing Autoimmune Encephalitis

Keely Shaw, 27, was feeling tired and getting a lot of headaches after breaking up with her boyfriend of 11 months. Chalking up her apparent illness to heartbreak, she left her home in Pontefract in the English county of West Yorkshire and went on a day trip to London in November 2013.

This young woman went on to experience sudden personality changes and seizures which lead to an anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis diagnosis in the UK. The full article can be found at http://www.opposingviews.com.

Copyright © January 25th, 2015 | Author Amanda Andrade-Rhoades

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Antiendomysial and antihuman recombinant tissue transglutaminase antibodies in the diagnosis of coeliac disease: a biopsy-proven European multicentre study.

The objective of this study was to investigate the value of serum (blood) “anti-tissue” transglutaminase IgA antibodies and IgA antiendomysial antibodies in the diagnosis of Coeliac (Celiac) Disease in a group of subjects in Europe.

This abstract only link was posted by G.D. on 19th November, 2014. The abstract can be found at http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/15647647.

© Authors | Colin P., et al

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Th17 Response and Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

The proinflammatory activity of T helper 17 (Th17) cells can be beneficial to the host during infection. However, uncontrolled or inappropriate Th17 activation has been linked to several autoimmune and autoinflammatory pathologies. Indeed, preclinical and clinical data show that Th17 cells are associated with several autoimmune diseases such as arthritis, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, and lupus. Furthermore, targeting the interleukin-17 (IL-17) pathway has attenuated disease severity in preclinical models of autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, a recent report brings to light a potential role for Th17 cells in the autoinflammatory disorder adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). Whether Th17 cells are the cause or are directly involved in AOSD remains to be shown. In this paper, we discuss the biology of Th17 cells, their role in autoimmune disease development, and in AOSD in particular, as well as the growing interest of the pharmaceutical industry in their use as therapeutic targets.

Copyright © 2012 Janelle C. Waite and Dimitris Skokos. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

This study was posted on 28th October, 2014 by G.D. to this thread – https://www.facebook.com/groups/564512313648230/permalink/589270541172407/.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s encephalopathy : epidemiology, pathogenesis and management.

Hashimoto’s encephalopathy is a term used to describe an encephalopathy of presumed autoimmune origin characterised by high titres of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies. In a similar fashion to autoimmune thyroid disease, Hashimoto’s encephalopathy is more common in women than in men. It has been reported in paediatric, adult and elderly populations throughout the world. The clinical presentation may involve a relapsing and remitting course and include seizures, stroke-like episodes, cognitive decline, neuropsychiatric symptoms and myoclonus.

The full text of this study can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17850170.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link PDF: Autoantibodies associated with diseases of the CNS: new developments and future challenges

Several CNS disorders associated with specifi c antibodies to ion channels, receptors, and other synaptic proteins have been recognised over the past 10 years, and can be often successfully treated with immunotherapies. Antibodies to components of voltage-gated potassium channel complexes (VGKCs), NMDA receptors (NMDARs), AMPA receptors (AMPARs), GABA type B receptors (GABABRs), and glycine receptors (GlyRs) can be identifi ed in patients and are associated with various clinical presentations, such as limbic encephalitis and complex and diff use encephalopathies. These diseases can be associated with tumours, but they are more often non-paraneoplastic, and antibody assays can help with diagnosis. The new specialty of immunotherapy-responsive CNS disorders is likely to expand further as more antibody targets are discovered. Recent fi ndings raise many questions about the classifi cation of these diseases, the relation between antibodies and specifi c clinical phenotypes, the relative pathological roles of serum and intrathecal antibodies, the mechanisms of autoantibody generation, and the development of optimum treatment strategies.

This article by Angela Vincent, Christian Bien, Sarosh Irani, and Patrick Waters talks about conditions of the CNS caused by autoantibodies. The full paper can be found at ResearchGate.net. This was posted to thread https://www.facebook.com/groups/251477975360/permalink/10154711712105361/ on 27th October, 2014 by G.D.

Copyright © The Lancet 2011 | Authors Angela Vincent, Christian Bien, Sarosh Irani, and Patric Waters

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Clinical Features of Infectious and Autoantibody Encephalitis

COMMENTARY. In this study, using the Granerod classification [2], encephalitis was defined as an acute encephalopathy with >-2 of the following: fever >38 °C, seizures or focal neurologic signs, CSF pleocytosis (>5wbc/uL) or elevated CSF neopterin (>30nmol/L), and EEG slowing or abnormal MRI. Confirmed diagnosis had the organism or autoantibody detected in CSF or brain. A probable diagnosis had serological evidence of acute infection or autoantibody, and a possible diagnosis was based on detection of the organism from stool or nasopharynx. The term infection-associated encephalopathy rather than encephalitis was used for encephalitis related to influenza virus or rotavirus. Encephalopathy is defined as an altered or reduced level of consciousness and change in personality or behavior or confusion lasting >24 hours.

The abstract only is available at http://www.pediatricneurologybriefs.com/article/view/pedneurbriefs-29-4-7/103.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.