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Video: RHR: Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) as a Treatment for Autoimmune Disease

An excellent and informative video on LDN therapy in autoimmune diseases.



This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: LDN Research Trust

The primary aim of the Trust is to initiate Clinical Trials of Low Dose Naltrexone, help and support those who have a condition where LDN could be of benefit obtain a prescription around the world.

LDN (low dose naltrexone) therapy can be beneficial in many autoimmune conditions including Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. For more information about this therapy and information you can share with your Primary Care Physician or General Practitioner, please visit http://www.ldnresearchtrust.org/.

You can also find a link to their info sheet on LDN therapy at http://www.ldnresearchtrust.org/sites/default/files/2016.pdf.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Low Dose Naltrexone

Low-dose naltrexone (LDN) describes the off-label use of the medication naltrexone at low doses for diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Naltrexone is typically prescribed for opioid dependence or alcohol dependence, as it is a strong opioid antagonist. Preliminary research has been promising for use of LDN in treating chronic medical conditions such as chronic pain, but at this stage the use of LDN as a treatment is still experimental and more research needs to be done before it can be widely recommended. – Wikipedia

According to the website, www.lowdosenaltrexone.org, LDN can “normalize the immune system, helping those with HIV/AIDS, cancer, autoimmune diseases, and central nervous system disorders”. The website gives information on what LDN is, how it works, and has a section on autoimmune diseases.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Nalcrom (sodium cromoglicate)

Nalcrom capsules contain the active ingredient sodium cromoglicate, which is a type of medicine used to relieve the symptoms of allergies.

This information was posted by S.H.  to this thread by G.D. – https://www.facebook.com/groups/564512313648230/permalink/589522931147168/. The link in the original post, created by G.D. is no longer available.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

IVIG (Side Effects)

IVIG Side Effects

The majority of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) side effects are mild, transient, and self-limited and do not require discontinuation of therapy.

 

The full list of side effects can be found at http://www.immunedisease.com/choosing-a-therapy/how-ivig-works/ivig-side-effects.html. This link was posted to comments on 18th April 2015 by T.A.O.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Carbamazepine/levetiracetam

Two women with Hashimoto’s encephalopathy developed hypersensitivity reactions to lamotrigine; one woman’s reaction worsened after addition of carbamazepine, while the other experienced a second reaction while receiving levetiracetam.

 

The abstract of this study/article can be found at http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs40278-014-7931-3.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Cytomel

Levothyroxine (Synthroid) is a synthetic version of T4, and liothyronine (Cytomel) is a synthetic version of T3. Both are used for the treatment ofhypothyroidism, but levothyroxine is preferred because T3 is absorbed from the intestine very rapidly, and this may cause mild thyroid hormone toxicity (hyperthyroidism) in some patients.

 

Read the full discussion about Cytomel vs Levothyroxine at http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=16899.

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Lorazepam

Lorazepam (trademarked as Ativan or Orfidal) is a high-potency, intermediate-duration, 3-hydroxy benzodiazepine drug, often used to treat anxiety disorders.[4]Lorazepam has all six intrinsic benzodiazepine effects including the ability to: reduce anxiety, interfere with new memory formation, reduce agitation/induce sleep, treat seizures, treat nausea and vomiting, and relax muscles.[5][6] Lorazepam is used for the short-term treatment of anxiety, insomnia, acute seizures including status epilepticus, and sedation of hospitalized patients, as well as sedation of aggressive patients.[6][7][8][9] Lorazepam is also the most common benzodiazepine used to decrease the likelihood of agitation and seizures in patients who have overdosed on stimulant drugs.[

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Olanzapine

Olanzapine (sold under the brand names Zyprexa, Zypadhera and Lanzek or in combination with fluoxetine, Symbyax) is an atypical antipsychotic that belongs tothienobenzodiazepine class, approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.[4] Olanzapine is structurally similar to clozapine and quetiapine, but is classified as a thienobenzodiazepine. Wikipedia

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Methylprednisolone

This MedScape gives information about methylprednisolone, also known as medrol and medrol dosepak. This can be very useful information for those on this medication or have had it suggested by their treating physician.

The full medication information can be found at medscape.com.

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.