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Link: The Hypothyroidism Diet + Natural Treatment

This link from S.E.L. posted on 3rd September, 2014, talks about Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis a.k.a. Hashimoto’s Disease or referred to simply as “hypothyroidism”.

Hypothyroidism is related to having an underactive thyroid gland that does not properly release hormones. According to Dr. Datis Kharrazian, 90% of people withhypothyroidism have Hashimoto’s, an autoimmune hypothyroid condition, whereby the immune system attacks thyroid tissue.

The full article can be found at http://draxe.com/hypothyroidism-diet-natural-treatment/.

Copyright © DrAxe.com

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s Disease: The Danger of Thyroid Antibodies and Pregnancy

By testing TSH alone, thyroid antibodies in Hashimoto’s may be missed, and your doctor may have no idea your baby is at risk.

Consider for a moment the number of babies lost to Hashimoto’s disease just because doctors fail to perform a simple blood test. Hashimoto’s is confirmed by lab tests for these two antibodies. If your doctor refuses to do these two tests, you have the option to order your own lab tests. Here is a Hashimoto’s thyroid panel for U.S. residents and here is thyroid testing including antibodiesavailable in Europe:

  1. Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (TPOAb)
  2. Thyroglobulin Antibodies (TgAb)

The full blog article about thyroid antibodies and pregnancy can be found at http://hypothyroidmom.com/hashimotos-disease-the-danger-of-thyroid-antibodies-and-pregnancy/.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Re: TPO v. microsomal abs in Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy

This link will take you to a Listserv specifically for neurologists and clinicians discussing a range of neurological and diagnostic testing information. This tread leads to a discussion on Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy between clinicians.

Re: TPO v. microsomal abs in Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy: Systematic Review of the Literature and an Additional Case

Hashimoto’s encephalopathy, first described in 1966, is still problematic in terms of its pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. The syndrome is more common in women, and is associated with autoimmune antithyroid antibodies. Presentation varies considerably; there may be episodes of cerebral ischemia, seizure, or psychosis, or there may be depression, cognitive decline, and periods of fluctuating consciousness. Because the symptoms respond so well to immunosuppressive treatment, prompt diagnosis and management are important. Here, the authors present a representative case report, along with a comprehensive review of current literature.

 

The full text can be read at http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/jnp.23.4.jnp384#.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Cognitive and affective dysfunctions in autoimmune thyroiditis

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT) is the most frequent cause of hypothyroidism in areas with sufficient iodine intake. While the impact of thyroid function on mood and cognition is well known, only in the recent years, an increasing number of studies report on the association of HT with cognitive and affective disturbances also in the euthyroid state. Recent imaging studies have shown that these impairments are accompanied by altered brain perfusion, in particular, in the frontal lobe and a reduced gray matter density in the left inferior gyrus frontalis. Brain function abnormalities in euthyroid patients with HT may be subtle and only detected by specific testing or even severe as it is the case in the rare neuropsychiatric disorder Hashimoto’s encephalopathy (HE).

 

The full text could not be located; however, the abstract can be found at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0889159114000749.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Antithyroid antibody-linked symptoms in borderline personality disorder

Circulating thyroid autoantibodies are more prevalent in patients with mood disorders than in the general population, but longitudinal clinical data that establish a relationship between thyroid antibody status and the course of any psychiatric syndrome have been lacking. In addition, scant attention has been paid to thyroid hormones and autoimmunity in borderline personality disorder (BPD). We report a case of a patient with classic BPD whose fluctuating mood and, especially, psychotic symptoms—rated using a double-blind method—were directly linked to antithyroglobulin antibody titers serially determined over an inpatient period of 275 d.

The abstract and first page can be found at http://link.springer.com/article/10.1385/ENDO:21:2:153.

Copyright © Endocrine July 2003 | Authors Dr. Thomas D. Geracioti Jr., Mitchel A. Kling, Robert M. Post, Philip W. Gold

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: When Hashimoto’s is misdiagnosed as bipolar disorder

After a bipolar diagnosis, this patient was prescribed eight different psychotropic medications and received a dozen electroconvulsive treatments.

After six months of support for Hashimoto’s, her symptoms resolved and she is now drug-free, with the exception of thyroid hormone medication. Was her bipolar disorder simply misdiagnosed Hashimoto’s?

 

The full article can be found at http://drknews.com/when-hashimotos-is-misdiagnosed-as-bipolar-disorder/.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s encephalopathy: A frequently missed diagnosis

Hashimoto’s encephalopathy is described as a syndrome of encephalopathy and high serum antithyroid antibodies that is responsive to glucocorticoid therapy. We report a patient with overt hypothyroidism who presented with stroke-like episodes and a status epilepticus which responded dramatically to intraveous methylprednisolone given for a severe bronchospasm following aspiration. The high antithyroid antibody titers and the response to steroids supported the diagnosis of Hashimoto’s encephalopathy. The diagnosis of Hashimoto’s encephalopathy is generally under diagnosed and often missed at presentation.

 

The full text can be found at http://www.pjms.com.pk/issues/aprjun108/article/casereport2.html.

Copyright © Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences | by Mohamed Osama Hegazi, Mubarak Alajmi, Yasser M Ateya

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: The use of plasma exchange in Hashimoto’s encephalopathy: A case report and review of the literature.

Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy (HE) is a very rare condition characterized by psychosis, seizures, cognitive fluctuations, and myoclonus. In a few published cases, plasma exchange has been used due to the theoretical removal of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (anti-TPO), one of the postulated causes of the condition.

 

The abstract can be found at unboundmedicine.com; however, the full text seems to only be available by purchase from the publisher. The full text can be published at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jca.21353/full.

 

Copyright © Journal of Clinical Apheresis 2014

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis in Patients with Normal TSH Levels

You can read the full article at MedScape.com. Viewing this article may require a subscription to medscape.com.

 

Copyright © MedScape.com 2014

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.