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antithyroid

Link: Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy: Systematic Review of the Literature and an Additional Case

Hashimoto’s encephalopathy, first described in 1966, is still problematic in terms of its pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. The syndrome is more common in women, and is associated with autoimmune antithyroid antibodies. Presentation varies considerably; there may be episodes of cerebral ischemia, seizure, or psychosis, or there may be depression, cognitive decline, and periods of fluctuating consciousness. Because the symptoms respond so well to immunosuppressive treatment, prompt diagnosis and management are important. Here, the authors present a representative case report, along with a comprehensive review of current literature.

 

The full text can be read at http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/jnp.23.4.jnp384#.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Antithyroid antibody-linked symptoms in borderline personality disorder

Circulating thyroid autoantibodies are more prevalent in patients with mood disorders than in the general population, but longitudinal clinical data that establish a relationship between thyroid antibody status and the course of any psychiatric syndrome have been lacking. In addition, scant attention has been paid to thyroid hormones and autoimmunity in borderline personality disorder (BPD). We report a case of a patient with classic BPD whose fluctuating mood and, especially, psychotic symptoms—rated using a double-blind method—were directly linked to antithyroglobulin antibody titers serially determined over an inpatient period of 275 d.

The abstract and first page can be found at http://link.springer.com/article/10.1385/ENDO:21:2:153.

Copyright © Endocrine July 2003 | Authors Dr. Thomas D. Geracioti Jr., Mitchel A. Kling, Robert M. Post, Philip W. Gold

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: FDG-PET findings in patients with suspected encephalitis.

To read the full text of this document, you may  have to sign up with one of the full-text services linked to on this page. However, the synopsis offers useful information about FDG-PET scanning and diagnosing encephalitis.

The general synopsis of this study is located at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15365433

 

Full Text Sources

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Ovid Technologies, Inc.

 

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This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy Cases: Chinese Experience

This study discusses Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy and it’s presentation of multiple neurologic symptoms and high anti-body titer. It specifically focuses on the Chinese population but may be of some interest for the purpose of personal research.

 

The full text of this article is found at BMC Neurology. Copyright © 2012 Tang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

 

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This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.