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Video: The REAL definition of Psychogenic Non-Epileptic Seizures – PNES

Psychogenic Non-Epileptic Seizures (PNES) and Non Epileptic Attack Disorder has too much garbage results. PLEASE remember to doubt everything you read. Double and triple check before you believe anything stating it’s a fact. Trust your own body/mind and don’t accept anything as fact that doesn’t ring true to you. There’s a major flaw in all search engine algorithms – they filter to get valuable content… BUT it doesn’t mean it’s accurate at all. THAT IS HARMFUL THAN SPAM. There are so many definitions and categorizations of this brain disorder, and it became soooooo obvious why there is misconception. It’s fairly clear to me that the majority of what I’ve read has not written by anyone with PNES or with them in mind in any case – just lots of wrong labels and with complete neglect of the fact that we are living, breathing, and feeling human beings. It’s up to us to get the right message out there.

Christine Mauriello talks about PNES – psychogenic seizures. She shares her experiences on her youtube.com page.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: The prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders in patients with euthyroid Hashimoto’s thyroiditis: a comparative study

Objective

The aim of this study was to examine the current prevalence of major depression and anxiety disorders in patients with euthyroid Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT) and euthyroid goiter.

 

The full text could not be located; however, the abstract is available at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0163834313002594.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. | Authors Ayhan, Medine Giynas, Faruk Uguz, Rustem Askin, and Mehmet Sait Gonen

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: This Is What A Panic Attack Physically Feels Like

For the millions of American adults who suffer from anxiety and panic disorders, panic attacks may be one of the most prevalent and persistent symptoms. And while the experience of a panic attack is different for each individual, there is one universal truth for all who suffer from them: They’re terrifying.

The full text can be found at The Huffington Post.

 

Copyright © 2014 TheHuffingtonPost.com, Inc | By Lindsay Holmes & Alissa Scheller

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Norwich man reveals his ‘horrendous’ battle with rare autoimmune disease

A Norwich man today told how he ended up in a mental health unit and attempted suicide because of a disease so rare it took months for doctors to diagnose.

The full article can be found at http://www.edp24.co.uk/.

 

Copyright © EDP24 January 2015 | by Tom Bristow

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Emotional Changes After Encephalitis

Emotional changes following Encephalitis may reflect the direct effect of Encephalitis on brain systems that help us to perceive understand and express our emotions. Emotional changes may also reflect an individual’s reaction to the difficulties in everyday functioning as a result of cognitive, motor or behavioural impairments.

The full article can be found at The Encephalitis Society.

 

Copyright © July 1999 The Encephalitis Society | by Bonnie-Kate Dewar, Clinical Neuropsychologist

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.