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Link: The neurologic significance of celiac disease biomarkers

Objective:

To report neurologic phenotypes and their etiologies determined among 68 patients with either (1) celiac disease (CD) or (2) no CD, but gliadin antibody positivity (2002-2012).

 

The full text could not be found of this article, however the abstract and conclusions can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25261501.

© 2014 American Academy of Neurology

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy Complicated by Cerebellar Ataxia: A Case Report

OBJECTIVE

To present a case of Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy (HE) with long-term neurological sequelae.

BACKGROUND:

Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy, also known as steroid responsive encephalopathy secondary to autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT), is a rare condition that typically affects middle aged females with known anti-TPO antibodies and a history of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. The diagnosis is often overlooked because there is no diagnostic biomarker, and patients can present with several non-specific neurological symptoms that are often incorrectly attributed to other disease processes. Neurological outcomes are rarely reported. It is important to recognize and distinguish HE from other encephalopathies as it is a distinct, treatable entity, which is almost always responsive to steroid therapy.

The study can be found at http://www.neurology.org/content/82/10_Supplement/P6.023.short. A membership may be needed to read the full text.

Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Neurology | by Dr. Michael Hossack and Dr. Perry Richardson

 

 

 

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

PDF Link: Autoantibodies Associated with Diseases of the CNS

Linked is a lengthy PDF article regarding multiple auto-immune diseases affecting the Central Nervous System.

Several CNS disorders associated with specifi c antibodies to ion channels, receptors, and other synaptic proteins have
been recognised over the past 10 years, and can be often successfully treated with immunotherapies. Antibodies to
components of voltage-gated potassium channel complexes (VGKCs), NMDA receptors (NMDARs), AMPA receptors
(AMPARs), GABA type B receptors (GABABRs), and glycine receptors (GlyRs) can be identifi ed in patients and are
associated with various clinical presentations, such as limbic encephalitis and complex and diff use encephalopathies.
These diseases can be associated with tumours, but they are more often non-paraneoplastic, and antibody assays can
help with diagnosis. The new specialty of immunotherapy-responsive CNS disorders is likely to expand further as
more antibody targets are discovered. Recent fi ndings raise many questions about the classifi cation of these diseases,
the relation between antibodies and specifi c clinical phenotypes, the relative pathological roles of serum and intrathecal
antibodies, the mechanisms of autoantibody generation, and the development of optimum treatment strategies.

 

The PDF can be found at Google Articles, published by www.thelancet.com in their August 2011 journal, Volume 10.

Copyright © 2011 The Lancet

 

 

 

 

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy Presenting with Progressive Cerebellar Ataxia

This study discusses a 41 year old female with multiple neurological complaints. It further suggests that Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy should be included in the differential diagnosis of a treatable ataxia. To read the full text, proceed to http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2077662/.

The full text of this article is found at PMC and was published in 2007.

Copyright © 2007 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd

 

 

 

 

 

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.