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autoantibodies

Link: Clinical Features of Infectious and Autoantibody Encephalitis

COMMENTARY. In this study, using the Granerod classification [2], encephalitis was defined as an acute encephalopathy with >-2 of the following: fever >38 °C, seizures or focal neurologic signs, CSF pleocytosis (>5wbc/uL) or elevated CSF neopterin (>30nmol/L), and EEG slowing or abnormal MRI. Confirmed diagnosis had the organism or autoantibody detected in CSF or brain. A probable diagnosis had serological evidence of acute infection or autoantibody, and a possible diagnosis was based on detection of the organism from stool or nasopharynx. The term infection-associated encephalopathy rather than encephalitis was used for encephalitis related to influenza virus or rotavirus. Encephalopathy is defined as an altered or reduced level of consciousness and change in personality or behavior or confusion lasting >24 hours.

The abstract only is available at http://www.pediatricneurologybriefs.com/article/view/pedneurbriefs-29-4-7/103.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Paraneoplastic Autoantibody Evaluation, Serum

Serological evaluation of patients who present with a subacute neurological disorder of undetermined etiology, especially those with known risk factors for cancer

  • Directing a focused search for cancer
  • Investigating neurological symptoms that appear in the course of, or after, cancer therapy, and are not explainable by metastasis
  • Differentiating autoimmune neuropathies from neurotoxic effects of chemotherapy
  • Monitoring the immune response of seropositive patients in the course of cancer therapy
  • Detecting early evidence of cancer recurrence in previously seropositive patients

This page gives detailed information on Mayo Clinic’s PVAL or paraneoplastic autoantibody testing via blood, known as  serum, testing. All the information and antibodies tested for can be found at http://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com/test-catalog/Overview/83380.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Paraneoplastic Antibodies

Purkinje cell antibodies, Neuronal antibodies

A family of autoantibodies recognising antigens in the brain which are associated with a variety of neurological manifestations occurring as a result of malignancy, usually ovarian or small cell carcinoma of the lung. The autantibodies may also recognise the tumour. Patients present with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration usually triggering a search for a previously unsuspected malignancy.There are several groups of autantibodies.

To read the full information, visit http://southtees.nhs.uk/services/pathology/tests/paraneoplastic-antibodies-anti-huyo-ri-ma/.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Clinical spectrum of voltage-gated potassium channel autoimmunity

Objective:

To document neurologic, oncologic, and serologic associations of patients in whom voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) autoantibodies were detected in the course of serologic evaluation for neuronal, glial, and muscle autoantibodies.

The abstract can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18474843.

Copyright © Neurology 2009

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Human N-methyl D-aspartate receptor antibodies alter memory and behaviour in mice

Anti-N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder that associates with prominent memory and behavioural deficits. Patients’ antibodies react with the N-terminal domain of the GluN1 (previously known as NR1) subunit of NMDAR causing in cultured neurons a selective and reversible internalization of cell-surface receptors. –

 

This was shared by G.D. on 25th November, 2014. To read the full text, proceed to http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2014/11/11/brain.awu310.

The full text of this article is found at Oxford University Press and was published in May of 2011. Copyright © 2014 Oxford University Press

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.