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Link: Clinicopathological Study of Patients With C9ORF72-Associated Frontotemporal Dementia Presenting With Delusions

Background: Several clinical studies point to a high prevalence of psychotic symptoms in frontotemporal dementia associated with C9ORF72 mutations, but clinicopathological studies addressing the association between C9ORF72 mutations and delusions are lacking.

The abstract of this interesting study can be found at http://jgp.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/10/20/0891988714554710.abstract.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s encephalopathy by Joana Ramalho, MD, and Mauricio Castillo, MD

This link posted by T.A.O. talks about Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy.

Abstract

We report a case of Hashimoto’s encephalopathy with atypical and partially reversible MRI findings. T2-weighted MRI images revealed bilaterally symmetric areas of increased signal in the mesial temporal lobes and basal ganglia. Despite clinical and imaging improvement after steroid therapy, some memory deficits and MRI abnormalities persisted.

The full study can be found at http://radiology.casereports.net/index.php/rcr/article/viewArticle/445/793.

Copyright: © 2011 The Authors | Joana Ramalho, MD, and Mauricio Castillo, MD

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Video: Encephalopathy Autoimmune Evaluation

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Neutralizing IL-17 protects the optic nerve from autoimmune pathology and prevents retinal nerve fiber layer atrophy during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

Optic neuritis is a common inflammatory manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the optic nerve is affected as well. Here, we investigated whether autoimmune inflammation in the optic nerve is distinct from inflammation in other parts of the central nervous system (CNS).

 

We were unable to find the full text online for free. However, the full text can purchased from Elsevier.

 

Copyright © August 2014 Elsevier | by Benjamin Kniera, Veit Rothhammera, Sylvia Heinka, Oliver Pukb, Jochen Grawb, Bernhard Hemmera, Thomas Korna

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Theta Waves

This page comes from Scottsdale Neurofeedback Institute and talks about Theta waves – what they are and what they can indicate. This is especially useful for those of us who have had and/or continue to have abnormal EEG results showing “excessive theta waves” during waking EEG and/or non-sleep deprived EEG studies.

The full text can be found at http://scottsdaleneurofeedback.com/.

 

Copyright © Scottsdale Neurofeedback Institute 2015

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Video: Dr Melanie Alarcio – World Encephalitis Day by Encephalitis Global

This video features Dr. Melanie Alarcio speaking at the FACES 2014 Encephalitis Conference in La Jolla, California. She talks about the book, Understanding Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy quite early in the seminar. This book can be found at Amazon.co.uk (and their dot com site) under the title Understanding Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy: A Guide for Patients, Families and Caregivers.

She gives a very useful explaination of what encephalopathy is and draws some distinctions between “encephalopathy” and “encephalitis” which is very useful to patients, advocates, and caregivers.

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Emotional Changes After Encephalitis

Emotional changes following Encephalitis may reflect the direct effect of Encephalitis on brain systems that help us to perceive understand and express our emotions. Emotional changes may also reflect an individual’s reaction to the difficulties in everyday functioning as a result of cognitive, motor or behavioural impairments.

The full article can be found at The Encephalitis Society.

 

Copyright © July 1999 The Encephalitis Society | by Bonnie-Kate Dewar, Clinical Neuropsychologist

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: A Case of Refractory Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy Demonstrating Improvement with Plasmapheresis (P5.227)

Objective

To describe an unusual case of Hashimoto’s encephalopathy (HE) associated with significant imaging findings that responded to plasmapheresis.

Background

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis was first described by Hakaru Hashimoto in 1912 but it was Lord Brain who first noted the association between thyroiditis and an unusual encephalopathy in 1966 that he called Hashimoto’s encephalopathy. As it appears unlikely that thyroid disease has a direct role in causing this disorder, many prefer the term “steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis” because of the disorder’s responsiveness to corticosteroids. HE can present with multiple neurologic manifestations, and its diagnosis requires the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies and the exclusion of other etiologies. While its progressive form is often well-recognized, patients with a waxing and waning course may provide diagnostic difficulty. Treatment with corticosteroids has been well-documented, but the benefit of immune-related therapies such as plasmapheresis has not been solidified.

 

 

The abstract of this study can be found at http://www.neurology.org/content/82/10_Supplement/P5.227.short. However, you may need to purchase the article or subscribe to the American Academy of Neurology to read the full text of this article.

Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Neurology | by Dr. Sarah Nelson, Dr. Yasir Jassam, and Dr. Lynne Taylor

Published in Neurology April 8th, 2014  vol. 82, no. 10 Supplement P5.227

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis

What is Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis?

Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is characterized by a brief but widespread attack of inflammation in the brain and spinal cord that damages myelin – the protective covering of nerve fibers.  ADEM often follows viral or bacterial infections, or less often, vaccination for measles, mumps, or rubella.  The symptoms of ADEM appear rapidly, beginning with encephalitis-like symptoms such as fever, fatigue, headache, nausea and vomiting, and in the most severe cases, seizures and coma.

– NINDS.NIH.GOV

The full text describing ADEM, it’s symptoms, and treatement can be found at http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/acute_encephalomyelitis/acute_encephalomyelitis.htm.

Copyright © The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Last updated February 14, 2014

 

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This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: “Burst and slow complexes” in nonconvulsive epileptic status

Generalized 1Hz, burst-and-slow-wave complexes were observed in a comatosed patient with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) when she showed extremely intractable, generalized convulsions and fragmented myoclonus in the whole body. Two types of short-latency SEPs were obtained separately during the burst and slow phase of the EEG (SEP-burst and SEP-slow, respectively), which showed a two fold greater amplitude of N20 in the former than in the latter. This suggests enhanced responsiveness to the peripheral stimuli during the burst phase as compared with the slow phase. CSF and serum were positive for autoantibodies to NMDA receptors. The “burst and slow complexes” reported here are considered to be an atypical EEG pattern of a generalized epileptic phenomenon.

The full text of this study can be found at http://www.jle.com/en/revues/epd/e-docs/burst_and_slow_complexes_in_nonconvulsive_epileptic_status_268136/article.phtml?tab=texte.

Copyright © March 2006 Epileptic Disorders

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This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.