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Link: Autoimmune Dementia Study

Dr Sean Pittock, MD, a consultant in the Division of MS and Autoimmune Neurology at the Mayo Clinic discusses the findings of a recent study investigating the clinical predictors of immunotherapy responsiveness in patients with presumed Autoimmune Dementia. Available at:http://tinyurl.com/cq95c85

This video from Mayo Proceedings, “the world’s fourth largest medical journal”. Dr. Sean Pittock speaks more to this topic in another Mayo Labratories video on youtube.com.

This video link was posted to comments by G.D. on a post to Autoimmune Encephalitis (All types including Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy) on 2nd June, 2015.

 


 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s encephalopathy : epidemiology, pathogenesis and management.

Hashimoto’s encephalopathy is a term used to describe an encephalopathy of presumed autoimmune origin characterised by high titres of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies. In a similar fashion to autoimmune thyroid disease, Hashimoto’s encephalopathy is more common in women than in men. It has been reported in paediatric, adult and elderly populations throughout the world. The clinical presentation may involve a relapsing and remitting course and include seizures, stroke-like episodes, cognitive decline, neuropsychiatric symptoms and myoclonus.

The full text of this study can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17850170.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Blog: #ZebraFightTonight against #HashimotosEncephalopathy

On the 26th of April, local Oregon news station, KMTR interviewed husband and wife, Tim and Kelly McCabe. Kelly is battling a rare autoimmune disease known as Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy (also know as Steroid Responsive Autoimmune Encephalopathy Associated with Thyroiditis or SREAT). Recently a member of the online support group, Understanding Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy – A Support Forum, Tabitha Andrews-Orth, met up with Kelly for the first time in person.

These women both have suffered extensively from this form of autoimmune encephalopathy, which has left them with long term neurological deficits and has impacted their quality of life. They are both treated for this rare condition by local neurologist, Dr. Estevez at RiverBend Hospital in Oregon. However, recently these two very ill women have been denied plasmapheresis treatment which was prescribed by Dr. Estevez as the best treatment for their debilitating medical condition. The board of directors at RiverBend Hospital are allegedly keeping these women from receiving treatment which has been scientifically proven to improve patients quality of life.

On the 27th of April, these two women followed by local supporters held a rally to support them in getting the treatment they desperately need. Kelly and Tabitha have compiled over 50 peer reviewed studies which support the use of plasmapheresis in patients diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy to deliver to the board representative. However, upon their previously announced arrival, no one met these women to receive the studies from Kelly and Tabitha. The women were, in full view of cameras and supporters, escorted from the premises by hospital security.

Their courageous battle has now taken to Facebook across three different groups who support patients diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy or other autoimmune encephalopathies, as well as providing information to those who suspect they may have this condition, as well as family, friends, and caregivers. The videos are being shared across the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. Furthermore, their fellow support group members are taking to social media, including Twitter and sharing the videos using the hashtags “#ZebraFightTonight” and “#HashimotosEncephalopathy”.

Time will ultimately tell how far this story will reach as those who support these two women continue to share their stories via social media. Dxiled will keep you posted on this story as it develops. For now, you can also follow this story on KMTR Eugene, OR by visiting their website http://www.kmtr.com/news.

The original story by Angelica Carrillo and KMTR staff can be found at http://www.kmtr.com/news/local/Denied-treatment-two-women–301378821.html?tab=video&c=y.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Clinicopathological Study of Patients With C9ORF72-Associated Frontotemporal Dementia Presenting With Delusions

Background: Several clinical studies point to a high prevalence of psychotic symptoms in frontotemporal dementia associated with C9ORF72 mutations, but clinicopathological studies addressing the association between C9ORF72 mutations and delusions are lacking.

The abstract of this interesting study can be found at http://jgp.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/10/20/0891988714554710.abstract.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Video: Dr Melanie Alarcio – World Encephalitis Day by Encephalitis Global

This video features Dr. Melanie Alarcio speaking at the FACES 2014 Encephalitis Conference in La Jolla, California. She talks about the book, Understanding Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy quite early in the seminar. This book can be found at Amazon.co.uk (and their dot com site) under the title Understanding Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy: A Guide for Patients, Families and Caregivers.

She gives a very useful explaination of what encephalopathy is and draws some distinctions between “encephalopathy” and “encephalitis” which is very useful to patients, advocates, and caregivers.

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Emotional Changes After Encephalitis

Emotional changes following Encephalitis may reflect the direct effect of Encephalitis on brain systems that help us to perceive understand and express our emotions. Emotional changes may also reflect an individual’s reaction to the difficulties in everyday functioning as a result of cognitive, motor or behavioural impairments.

The full article can be found at The Encephalitis Society.

 

Copyright © July 1999 The Encephalitis Society | by Bonnie-Kate Dewar, Clinical Neuropsychologist

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: A Case of Refractory Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy Demonstrating Improvement with Plasmapheresis (P5.227)

Objective

To describe an unusual case of Hashimoto’s encephalopathy (HE) associated with significant imaging findings that responded to plasmapheresis.

Background

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis was first described by Hakaru Hashimoto in 1912 but it was Lord Brain who first noted the association between thyroiditis and an unusual encephalopathy in 1966 that he called Hashimoto’s encephalopathy. As it appears unlikely that thyroid disease has a direct role in causing this disorder, many prefer the term “steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis” because of the disorder’s responsiveness to corticosteroids. HE can present with multiple neurologic manifestations, and its diagnosis requires the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies and the exclusion of other etiologies. While its progressive form is often well-recognized, patients with a waxing and waning course may provide diagnostic difficulty. Treatment with corticosteroids has been well-documented, but the benefit of immune-related therapies such as plasmapheresis has not been solidified.

 

 

The abstract of this study can be found at http://www.neurology.org/content/82/10_Supplement/P5.227.short. However, you may need to purchase the article or subscribe to the American Academy of Neurology to read the full text of this article.

Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Neurology | by Dr. Sarah Nelson, Dr. Yasir Jassam, and Dr. Lynne Taylor

Published in Neurology April 8th, 2014  vol. 82, no. 10 Supplement P5.227

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s Encephalitis: Unusual Cause of Reversible Dementia

Abstract:

Hashimoto’s encephalopathy (HE) is a poorly understood and often misdiagnosed rare autoimmune disease with varied neurological and psychiatric features. The low prevalence and varied clinical features coupled with unclear pathogenesis and histopathologic characteristics have caused still doubts in any particular diagnostic criteria. Therefore, more case studies are needed to characterize the clinical, laboratory and imaging features and outcomes of HE patients. We describe a case of such a patient with HE presenting with dementia and focus on its early recognition as the cognitive changes are reversible.

The full text can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4209691/.

 

Copyright  © Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care | by Kuljeet Singh Anand, Jyoti Garg, Rohit Verma, and Anirban Chakraborty

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: “Burst and slow complexes” in nonconvulsive epileptic status

Generalized 1Hz, burst-and-slow-wave complexes were observed in a comatosed patient with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) when she showed extremely intractable, generalized convulsions and fragmented myoclonus in the whole body. Two types of short-latency SEPs were obtained separately during the burst and slow phase of the EEG (SEP-burst and SEP-slow, respectively), which showed a two fold greater amplitude of N20 in the former than in the latter. This suggests enhanced responsiveness to the peripheral stimuli during the burst phase as compared with the slow phase. CSF and serum were positive for autoantibodies to NMDA receptors. The “burst and slow complexes” reported here are considered to be an atypical EEG pattern of a generalized epileptic phenomenon.

The full text of this study can be found at http://www.jle.com/en/revues/epd/e-docs/burst_and_slow_complexes_in_nonconvulsive_epileptic_status_268136/article.phtml?tab=texte.

Copyright © March 2006 Epileptic Disorders

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This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Autoimmune Limbic Encephalitis With GAD Antibodies

The neurologic presentation of limbic encephalitis is variable and when it occurs due to a rare cause the diagnosis may be problematic. We present a case of autoimmune limbic encephalitis due to glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody and consider the magnetic resonance imaging and antineural antibody screening aspects in the diagnosis of this entity.

This study can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3726075/.

Copyright © Sage Publications 2011, Pasquale F. Finelli, MD

 

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This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.