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Link: Autoimmune Dementia Study

Dr Sean Pittock, MD, a consultant in the Division of MS and Autoimmune Neurology at the Mayo Clinic discusses the findings of a recent study investigating the clinical predictors of immunotherapy responsiveness in patients with presumed Autoimmune Dementia. Available at:http://tinyurl.com/cq95c85

This video from Mayo Proceedings, “the world’s fourth largest medical journal”. Dr. Sean Pittock speaks more to this topic in another Mayo Labratories video on youtube.com.

This video link was posted to comments by G.D. on a post to Autoimmune Encephalitis (All types including Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy) on 2nd June, 2015.

 


 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: High prevalence of NMDA receptor IgA/IgM antibodies in different dementia types

To retrospectively determine the frequency of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR) autoantibodies in patients with different forms of dementia.

This full text discusses the discovery of NMDA antibodies in those with dementias. The text can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/acn3.120/full.

© 2014 The Authors. Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc on behalf of American Neurological Association.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Neurological disorders: a public health approach

This informative document discusses public health concerns regarding a few common neurological conditions including dementia and epilepsy. The full document can be found on their website, www.who.int.

© World Health Organisation

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Clinicopathological Study of Patients With C9ORF72-Associated Frontotemporal Dementia Presenting With Delusions

Background: Several clinical studies point to a high prevalence of psychotic symptoms in frontotemporal dementia associated with C9ORF72 mutations, but clinicopathological studies addressing the association between C9ORF72 mutations and delusions are lacking.

The abstract of this interesting study can be found at http://jgp.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/10/20/0891988714554710.abstract.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Video: ABC NIGHTLINE Tells America About the Virtual Dementia Tour®

ABC News reporter Cynthia McFadden experiences the Virtual Dementia Tour and shares the story of a family facing Alzheimer’s disease. The Virtual Dementia Tour® is a scientifically proven method of building a greater understanding of dementia through the use of patented sensory tools and instruction. Created by P.K. Beville, M.S., an award-winning geriatric specialist and founder of Second Wind Dreams®, proceeds from the sale of Virtual Dementia Tour® kits support the work of Second Wind Dreams®, an international, nonprofit organization recognized as the first in the nation committed to changing the perception of aging through the fulfillment of dreams for elders. For more information about Second Wind Dreams® and The Virtual Dementia Tour® visit www.secondwind.org.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimotos Encephalopathy – A Reversible Cause of Dementia

A form of potentially reversible Autoimmune Dementia, Steroid Response Encephalopathy Associated With Autoimmune Thyroiditis (SREAT), also known as Hashimoto Encephalopathy (HE) is characterised by confusion with or without myoclonus, seizures, hyperreflexia, and psychosis.

Presentation may be an insidious development of cognitive impairment or recurrent acute episodes of focal neurological deficit with confusion (can present acutely with multiple recurrent focal neurological events or with a progressive, diffuse pattern characterized by cognitive impairment). It is under-recognized by physicians.

 

The full article can be found at http://www.thedementiacure.com/hashimotos-encephalopathy-a-reversible-cause-of-dementia/.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Immunologically Mediated Dementias

Although most dementias are due to neurodegenerative or vascular disease, it is important to diagnose immunologically mediated dementias quickly because they can be both rapidly progressive and readily treatable. They usually affect function of limbic and cortical structures, but subcortical involvement can also occur. Because of the variety of symptoms and the rapid course, these dementias present a particular challenge to the clinician and may require evaluation and intervention in the inpatient setting. Diagnostic workup typically reveals evidence of an autoimmune process and, in some cases, cancer. In contrast to the neurodegenerative processes, many of the immunologically mediated dementias respond to immunomodulatory therapy.

The full text can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2832614/.

Copyright © Current Neurology and Neuroscience | Authors Rosenbloom, Michael H., Sallie Smith, Gulden Akdal, and Michael D. Geschwind

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s encephalopathy mimicking presenile dementia

Abstract

Hashimoto’s encephalopathy (HE), which carries kaleidoscopic clinical presentations, is easily misdiagnosed in clinical practice. Early diagnosis and prompt initiation of steroid therapy are associated with good prognosis. We describe a 50-year-old female patient who had subclinical hypothyroidism and who presented herself with gradual cognitive impairment, accompanied with auditory hallucination and delusion. Increased anti-thyroid antibodies titers were found in her serum and cerebrospinal fluid. The HE diagnosis was confirmed using the laboratory test for anti-thyroid antibodies along with the patient’s clinical presentation. We treated her with steroid pulse therapy, and the results were favorable. We highlight this case to call for early diagnosis and prompt intervention of HE in clinical practice.

The full text can be purchased from Science Direct. This study was published in General Hospital Psychiatry.

 

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. | General Hospital Psychiatry Volume 36, May/June 2014, Page 360

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: A Case of Refractory Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy Demonstrating Improvement with Plasmapheresis (P5.227)

Objective

To describe an unusual case of Hashimoto’s encephalopathy (HE) associated with significant imaging findings that responded to plasmapheresis.

Background

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis was first described by Hakaru Hashimoto in 1912 but it was Lord Brain who first noted the association between thyroiditis and an unusual encephalopathy in 1966 that he called Hashimoto’s encephalopathy. As it appears unlikely that thyroid disease has a direct role in causing this disorder, many prefer the term “steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis” because of the disorder’s responsiveness to corticosteroids. HE can present with multiple neurologic manifestations, and its diagnosis requires the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies and the exclusion of other etiologies. While its progressive form is often well-recognized, patients with a waxing and waning course may provide diagnostic difficulty. Treatment with corticosteroids has been well-documented, but the benefit of immune-related therapies such as plasmapheresis has not been solidified.

 

 

The abstract of this study can be found at http://www.neurology.org/content/82/10_Supplement/P5.227.short. However, you may need to purchase the article or subscribe to the American Academy of Neurology to read the full text of this article.

Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Neurology | by Dr. Sarah Nelson, Dr. Yasir Jassam, and Dr. Lynne Taylor

Published in Neurology April 8th, 2014  vol. 82, no. 10 Supplement P5.227

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s Encephalitis: Unusual Cause of Reversible Dementia

Abstract:

Hashimoto’s encephalopathy (HE) is a poorly understood and often misdiagnosed rare autoimmune disease with varied neurological and psychiatric features. The low prevalence and varied clinical features coupled with unclear pathogenesis and histopathologic characteristics have caused still doubts in any particular diagnostic criteria. Therefore, more case studies are needed to characterize the clinical, laboratory and imaging features and outcomes of HE patients. We describe a case of such a patient with HE presenting with dementia and focus on its early recognition as the cognitive changes are reversible.

The full text can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4209691/.

 

Copyright  © Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care | by Kuljeet Singh Anand, Jyoti Garg, Rohit Verma, and Anirban Chakraborty

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.