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Link: Ethical Issues in the Management of Thyroid Disease

KEY POINTS  The focus of this article is on clinical ethics issues in the thyroid disease context.  In the context of thyroid disease management, clinical ethics dilemmas affect a wide range of health care providers: endocrinologists, primary care physicians, surgeons, oncologists, nuclear medicine specialists and technologists, genetic counselors, nurses, and physician assistants.  In autoimmune thyroid disease, there are unique challenges to informed consent, and potential duties to warn in severe hypothyroidism.  In thyroid cancer, the most common ethical issues revolve around truth-telling and advance care planning, and genetic screening for medullary thyroid cancer.  Novel ethical issues in thyroid disease include end of life discussions in poorly differentiated thyroid cancers; priority-set

 

The full study is not available but the first page is available at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0889852914000140?np=y.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: UK Guidelines for the Use of Thyroid Function Tests

Purpose of the guidelines

It is hoped that the document will provide guidance for primary care physicians, specialist physicians, endocrinologists, and clinical biochemists. The accompanying patient information sets have been especially designed to explain thyroid function testing and to summarise the main recommendations in the guidelines in everyday language. The purpose of the guidelines is to encourage a greater understanding of thyroid function testing amongst all stakeholders with a view to the widespread adoption of harmonised good practice in the diagnosis and management of patients with thyroid disorders. The guidelines are also intended to provide a basis for local and national audit and each section offers recommendations that are suitable for the audit process. The document should be considered as guidelines only; it is not intended to serve as a standard of medical care. The doctors concerned must make the management plan for an individual patient. The focus of the document is thyroid function testing, and it is not intended to be a comprehensive text on thyroid disorders.

 

This guide may be of particular interest to women who wish to get pregnant and who also have been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy, or who have a family history of thyroid disease, or women who are currently in the early stages of pregnancy. The full document can be found at  http://www.british-thyroid-association.org/info-for-patients/Docs/TFT_guideline_final_version_July_2006.pdf

Copyright © The British thyroid Association 2006

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.