Post Archives

Visitor Survey

Visitor Survey

Hashimotos Encephalopathy

Video: RHR: Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) as a Treatment for Autoimmune Disease

An excellent and informative video on LDN therapy in autoimmune diseases.



This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Private Medical Services by UK Doctors

While we do not advocate using online pharmacies that are not montiored by reputable GPs, some patients may find this link informative and help form an understanding of what autoimmune conditions LDN (low dose naltrexone) may help treat. Please always review your current medications with your GP before starting LDN therapy.

 

https://www.prescribe4me.co.uk/questionnaires/ldn.aspx

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s encephalopathy : epidemiology, pathogenesis and management.

Hashimoto’s encephalopathy is a term used to describe an encephalopathy of presumed autoimmune origin characterised by high titres of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies. In a similar fashion to autoimmune thyroid disease, Hashimoto’s encephalopathy is more common in women than in men. It has been reported in paediatric, adult and elderly populations throughout the world. The clinical presentation may involve a relapsing and remitting course and include seizures, stroke-like episodes, cognitive decline, neuropsychiatric symptoms and myoclonus.

The full text of this study can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17850170.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Blog: #ZebraFightTonight against #HashimotosEncephalopathy

On the 26th of April, local Oregon news station, KMTR interviewed husband and wife, Tim and Kelly McCabe. Kelly is battling a rare autoimmune disease known as Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy (also know as Steroid Responsive Autoimmune Encephalopathy Associated with Thyroiditis or SREAT). Recently a member of the online support group, Understanding Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy – A Support Forum, Tabitha Andrews-Orth, met up with Kelly for the first time in person.

These women both have suffered extensively from this form of autoimmune encephalopathy, which has left them with long term neurological deficits and has impacted their quality of life. They are both treated for this rare condition by local neurologist, Dr. Estevez at RiverBend Hospital in Oregon. However, recently these two very ill women have been denied plasmapheresis treatment which was prescribed by Dr. Estevez as the best treatment for their debilitating medical condition. The board of directors at RiverBend Hospital are allegedly keeping these women from receiving treatment which has been scientifically proven to improve patients quality of life.

On the 27th of April, these two women followed by local supporters held a rally to support them in getting the treatment they desperately need. Kelly and Tabitha have compiled over 50 peer reviewed studies which support the use of plasmapheresis in patients diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy to deliver to the board representative. However, upon their previously announced arrival, no one met these women to receive the studies from Kelly and Tabitha. The women were, in full view of cameras and supporters, escorted from the premises by hospital security.

Their courageous battle has now taken to Facebook across three different groups who support patients diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy or other autoimmune encephalopathies, as well as providing information to those who suspect they may have this condition, as well as family, friends, and caregivers. The videos are being shared across the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. Furthermore, their fellow support group members are taking to social media, including Twitter and sharing the videos using the hashtags “#ZebraFightTonight” and “#HashimotosEncephalopathy”.

Time will ultimately tell how far this story will reach as those who support these two women continue to share their stories via social media. Dxiled will keep you posted on this story as it develops. For now, you can also follow this story on KMTR Eugene, OR by visiting their website http://www.kmtr.com/news.

The original story by Angelica Carrillo and KMTR staff can be found at http://www.kmtr.com/news/local/Denied-treatment-two-women–301378821.html?tab=video&c=y.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: ‘What can happen if you’re not treated is a coma, or ultimately death’

SPRINGFIELD, Ore. – Two women suffering from a rare autoimmune disease said they were denied treatment at RiverBend Hospital.

The two women suffer from a disease called Hashimoto’s Encephalitis. It’s a disorder that causes inflammation of the brain.

A specialist recommended both patients receive a specific treatment at RiverBend Hospital, but the hospital allegedly denied their request for more treatment.

 

Posted by S.C. on 27th April, 2015.

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: SAT-064: Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Associated with Steroid-Responsive Encephalopathy: A Case Report on Hashimoto′s Encephalopathy

Hashimoto’s encephalopathy (HE) is a rare and underdiagnosed clinical entity presenting as a neuropsychiatric syndrome, associated with serologic evidence of antithyroid antibodies after other causes of encephalopathy are excluded. The main hallmark of HE is its good prognosis and responsiveness to steroids and immunosupressants. We report a case of a patient with elevated thyroid antibodies presenting with aphasia, confusion and lethargy, dramatically improved after steroid therapy.

 

The abstract can be found at http://press.endocrine.org/doi/abs/10.1210/endo-meetings.2015.THPTA.8.SAT-064.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s encephalopathy by Joana Ramalho, MD, and Mauricio Castillo, MD

This link posted by T.A.O. talks about Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy.

Abstract

We report a case of Hashimoto’s encephalopathy with atypical and partially reversible MRI findings. T2-weighted MRI images revealed bilaterally symmetric areas of increased signal in the mesial temporal lobes and basal ganglia. Despite clinical and imaging improvement after steroid therapy, some memory deficits and MRI abnormalities persisted.

The full study can be found at http://radiology.casereports.net/index.php/rcr/article/viewArticle/445/793.

Copyright: © 2011 The Authors | Joana Ramalho, MD, and Mauricio Castillo, MD

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s myoclonic encephalopathy: an underdiagnosed treatable condition?

We report two patients with subacute diffuse encephalopathy characterized by confusion, myoclonic encephalopathy, and mild akineto-rigid extrapyramidal signs in one case and by apathy, memory deficit, and partial complex seizures in the other.

 

Unfortunately this is an abstract only but useful information for those suffering myoclonic jerks and Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy. The abstract can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8866497/.

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Autoantibodies to neuronal surface antigens in thyroid antibody-positive and -negative limbic encephalitis

Background : Thyroid antibodies (Thy-Abs) are frequently detected in various autoimmune disorders in coexistence with other systemic autoantibodies. In association with an encephalopathy, they are often taken as evidence of Hashimoto’s encephalitis (HE). However, the presence of Thy-Abs in a cohort of limbic encephalitis (LE) patients and their association with anti-neuronal autoimmunity has not been explored. Patients and Methods : We investigated thyroid and anti-neuronal antibodies in the sera of 24 LE patients without identified tumors by cell-based assay and radioimmunoassay and evaluated their clinical features. Results : There was a female predominance in Thy-Ab-positive LE patients. Five of the eight Thy-Ab-positive patients and six of the 16 Thy-Ab-negative patients had antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC), N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) or undefined surface antigens on cultured hippocampal neurons. There were trends towards fewer VGKC antibodies (1/8 vs. 5/16, P = 0.159) and more NMDAR antibodies (2/8 vs. 1/16, P = 0.095) among the Thy-Ab-positive LE patients; antibodies to undefined surface antigens were only identified in Thy-Ab-positive patients (2/8 vs. 0/16, P = 0.018). There were no distinguishing clinical features between Thy-Ab-positive patients with and without neuronal antibodies. However, patients with anti-neuronal antibodies showed a better treatment response. Conclusion : Thy-Abs can be found in a high proportion of patients with non-paraneoplastic LE, often in association with antibodies to specific or as yet undefined neuronal surface antigens. These results suggest that acute idiopathic encephalitis patients with Thy-Abs should be closely monitored for ion-channel antibodies and it should not be assumed that they have HE.

 

The full study can be found at http://neurologyindia.com.

Copyright © Neurology India 2011

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimotos Encephalopathy – A Reversible Cause of Dementia

A form of potentially reversible Autoimmune Dementia, Steroid Response Encephalopathy Associated With Autoimmune Thyroiditis (SREAT), also known as Hashimoto Encephalopathy (HE) is characterised by confusion with or without myoclonus, seizures, hyperreflexia, and psychosis.

Presentation may be an insidious development of cognitive impairment or recurrent acute episodes of focal neurological deficit with confusion (can present acutely with multiple recurrent focal neurological events or with a progressive, diffuse pattern characterized by cognitive impairment). It is under-recognized by physicians.

 

The full article can be found at http://www.thedementiacure.com/hashimotos-encephalopathy-a-reversible-cause-of-dementia/.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.