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hashimotos thyroiditis

Video: RHR: Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) as a Treatment for Autoimmune Disease

An excellent and informative video on LDN therapy in autoimmune diseases.



This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: LDN Research Trust

The primary aim of the Trust is to initiate Clinical Trials of Low Dose Naltrexone, help and support those who have a condition where LDN could be of benefit obtain a prescription around the world.

LDN (low dose naltrexone) therapy can be beneficial in many autoimmune conditions including Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. For more information about this therapy and information you can share with your Primary Care Physician or General Practitioner, please visit http://www.ldnresearchtrust.org/.

You can also find a link to their info sheet on LDN therapy at http://www.ldnresearchtrust.org/sites/default/files/2016.pdf.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Private Medical Services by UK Doctors

While we do not advocate using online pharmacies that are not montiored by reputable GPs, some patients may find this link informative and help form an understanding of what autoimmune conditions LDN (low dose naltrexone) may help treat. Please always review your current medications with your GP before starting LDN therapy.

 

https://www.prescribe4me.co.uk/questionnaires/ldn.aspx

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Ethical Issues in the Management of Thyroid Disease

KEY POINTS  The focus of this article is on clinical ethics issues in the thyroid disease context.  In the context of thyroid disease management, clinical ethics dilemmas affect a wide range of health care providers: endocrinologists, primary care physicians, surgeons, oncologists, nuclear medicine specialists and technologists, genetic counselors, nurses, and physician assistants.  In autoimmune thyroid disease, there are unique challenges to informed consent, and potential duties to warn in severe hypothyroidism.  In thyroid cancer, the most common ethical issues revolve around truth-telling and advance care planning, and genetic screening for medullary thyroid cancer.  Novel ethical issues in thyroid disease include end of life discussions in poorly differentiated thyroid cancers; priority-set

 

The full study is not available but the first page is available at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0889852914000140?np=y.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s Disease: The Danger of Thyroid Antibodies and Pregnancy

By testing TSH alone, thyroid antibodies in Hashimoto’s may be missed, and your doctor may have no idea your baby is at risk.

Consider for a moment the number of babies lost to Hashimoto’s disease just because doctors fail to perform a simple blood test. Hashimoto’s is confirmed by lab tests for these two antibodies. If your doctor refuses to do these two tests, you have the option to order your own lab tests. Here is a Hashimoto’s thyroid panel for U.S. residents and here is thyroid testing including antibodiesavailable in Europe:

  1. Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (TPOAb)
  2. Thyroglobulin Antibodies (TgAb)

The full blog article about thyroid antibodies and pregnancy can be found at http://hypothyroidmom.com/hashimotos-disease-the-danger-of-thyroid-antibodies-and-pregnancy/.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: UK Guidelines for the Use of Thyroid Function Tests

Purpose of the guidelines

It is hoped that the document will provide guidance for primary care physicians, specialist physicians, endocrinologists, and clinical biochemists. The accompanying patient information sets have been especially designed to explain thyroid function testing and to summarise the main recommendations in the guidelines in everyday language. The purpose of the guidelines is to encourage a greater understanding of thyroid function testing amongst all stakeholders with a view to the widespread adoption of harmonised good practice in the diagnosis and management of patients with thyroid disorders. The guidelines are also intended to provide a basis for local and national audit and each section offers recommendations that are suitable for the audit process. The document should be considered as guidelines only; it is not intended to serve as a standard of medical care. The doctors concerned must make the management plan for an individual patient. The focus of the document is thyroid function testing, and it is not intended to be a comprehensive text on thyroid disorders.

 

This guide may be of particular interest to women who wish to get pregnant and who also have been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy, or who have a family history of thyroid disease, or women who are currently in the early stages of pregnancy. The full document can be found at  http://www.british-thyroid-association.org/info-for-patients/Docs/TFT_guideline_final_version_July_2006.pdf

Copyright © The British thyroid Association 2006

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy Update

First described in 1966, Hashimoto’s encephalopathy (HE) is still considered a controversial disorder, likely under-recognized, with diagnosis primarily based on exclusion. That is, if no other causes for the neurological symptoms are found and high titers of thyroid antibodies are present, a diagnosis of HE is made.

 

This article comes from the blog The Wellness Blog with Elaine Moore. She writes in November of 2011 about Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy on her referenced blog. You can read the full text at http://www.elaine-moore.com/Blog/tabid/60/Post/482/Hashimoto-s-Encephalopathy-Update.

 

Copyright © Author Elaine Moore 2011

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: 6 Signs You Have An Autoimmune Disease

Lupus. Multiple sclerosis. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Sjogren’s syndrome. Rheumatoid arthritis. Autoimmune hepatitis. Celiac disease. Crohn’s disease. Juvenile-onset diabetes. Most people are surprised to learn that these are all examples of autoimmune diseases.

 

The full article can be found at http://blackdoctor.org/1508/what-is-autoimmune-disease/.

Copyright © 2015, BlackDoctor, Inc . All Rights Reserved

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Cognitive and affective dysfunctions in autoimmune thyroiditis

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT) is the most frequent cause of hypothyroidism in areas with sufficient iodine intake. While the impact of thyroid function on mood and cognition is well known, only in the recent years, an increasing number of studies report on the association of HT with cognitive and affective disturbances also in the euthyroid state. Recent imaging studies have shown that these impairments are accompanied by altered brain perfusion, in particular, in the frontal lobe and a reduced gray matter density in the left inferior gyrus frontalis. Brain function abnormalities in euthyroid patients with HT may be subtle and only detected by specific testing or even severe as it is the case in the rare neuropsychiatric disorder Hashimoto’s encephalopathy (HE).

 

The full text could not be located; however, the abstract can be found at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0889159114000749.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Thyroid Functions and Bipolar Affective Disorder

Accumulating evidence suggests that hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis dysfunction is relevant to the pathophysiology and clinical course of bipolar affective disorder. Hypothyroidism, either overt or more commonly subclinical, appears to the commonest abnormality found in bipolar disorder. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction is also likely to be greater among patients with rapid cycling and other refractory forms of the disorder. Lithium-treatment has potent antithyroid effects and can induce hypothyroidism or exacerbate a preexisting hypothyroid state. Even minor perturbations of the HPT axis may affect the outcome of bipolar disorder, necessitating careful monitoring of thyroid functions of patients on treatment. Supplementation with high dose thyroxine can be considered in some patients with treatment-refractory bipolar disorder. Neurotransmitter, neuroimaging, and genetic studies have begun to provide clues, which could lead to an improved understanding of the thyroid-bipolar disorder connection, and more optimal ways of managing this potentially disabling condition.

The full text can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3144691/.

Copyright © 2011 Subho Chakrabarti.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.