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Link: Clinical Features of Infectious and Autoantibody Encephalitis

COMMENTARY. In this study, using the Granerod classification [2], encephalitis was defined as an acute encephalopathy with >-2 of the following: fever >38 °C, seizures or focal neurologic signs, CSF pleocytosis (>5wbc/uL) or elevated CSF neopterin (>30nmol/L), and EEG slowing or abnormal MRI. Confirmed diagnosis had the organism or autoantibody detected in CSF or brain. A probable diagnosis had serological evidence of acute infection or autoantibody, and a possible diagnosis was based on detection of the organism from stool or nasopharynx. The term infection-associated encephalopathy rather than encephalitis was used for encephalitis related to influenza virus or rotavirus. Encephalopathy is defined as an altered or reduced level of consciousness and change in personality or behavior or confusion lasting >24 hours.

The abstract only is available at http://www.pediatricneurologybriefs.com/article/view/pedneurbriefs-29-4-7/103.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Iron in Chronic Brain Disorders: Imaging and Neurotherapeutic Implications

Iron is important for brain oxygen transport, electron transfer, neurotransmitter synthesis, and myelin production. Though iron deposition has been observed in the brain with normal aging, increased iron has also been shown in many chronic neurologic disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and multiple sclerosis. In vitro studies have demonstrated that excessive iron can lead to free radical production, which can promote neurotoxicity. However, the link between observed iron deposition and pathologic processes underlying various diseases of the brain is not well understood. It is not known whether excessivein vivo iron directly contributes to tissue damage or is solely an epiphenomenon. In this article we focus on the imaging of brain iron and the underlying physiology and metabolism relating to iron deposition. We conclude with a discussion of the potential implications of iron-related toxicity to neurotherapeutic development.

The full study can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1963417/. Posted by G.D. on 24th April 2015.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Video: Frontal Lobe Damage Impacts Behavior 403

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Autoimmune encephalitis: a case series and comprehensive review of the literature

Encephalitic syndromes are a common medical emergency. The importance of early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is paramount. If initial investigations for infectious agents prove negative, other diagnoses must be considered promptly. Autoimmune encephalitides are being increasingly recognized as important (and potentially reversible) non-infectious causes of an encephalitic syndrome. We describe four patients with autoimmune encephalitis—3 auto-antibody positive, 1 auto-antibody negative—treated during the last 18 months. A comprehensive review of the literature in this expanding area will be of interest to the infectious diseases, general medical and neurology community.

 

http://qjmed.oxfordjournals.org/content/104/11/921.long

Copyright © 2011 Association of Physicians of Great Britain and Ireland | Authors T. Wingfield , C. Mchugh , A. Vas , A. Richardson , E. Wilkins , A. Bonington , A. Varma

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Dr. Joel Oger

Joel Oger

Docteur en mèdecine
Professor emeritus

A list of citations by Dr. Joel Oger can be found here at his http://www.researchgate.net profile.

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

PDF Link: Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy Presenting as Acute Psychosis

Abstract:

Hashimoto’s encephalopathy is a relapsing encephalopathy occurring in association with
Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, with high titers of anti-thyroid antibodies. Clinically the patients may presents with acute or
subacute encephalopathy, seizure, myoclonus, and tremulousness, stroke like episode, amnesia or dementia. Here
we are reporting a case of hashimoto’s encephalopathy who presented with features of acute psychosis.

The full study can be found at http://omicsgroup.org/journals/hashimotos-encephalopathy-presenting-as-acute-psychosis-ijn-1000131.pdf. This will open a PDF of the study.

Copyright © Rameshwar Nath Chaurasia and Vijay Mishra Associate Professor, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Neurology, India

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: [C]-(R)PK11195 tracer kinetics in the brain of glioma patients and a comparison of two referencing approaches

The full text of this study of Translocator Protein (TSPO) as a biomarker for neuroinflamation can be found at http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00259-013-2447-2/fulltext.html. You may download the PDF of this article by following this link.

 

Copyright © 29th May, 2013 European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging  – Zhangjie Su , Karl Herholz, Alexander Gerhard, Federico Roncaroli, Daniel Du Plessis,Alan Jackson, Federico Turkheimer and Rainer Hinz

 

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This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders without and with autoimmune diseases

Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) can coexist with non-organ-specific or organ-specific autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the features between NMOSD without and with autoimmune diseases, and NMOSD with non-organ-specific and organ-specific autoimmune diseases.

To read the full text, proceed to http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2077662/.

The full text of this article is found at BMC Neurlogy and was published in May of 2014. Copyright © August 19th 2014 BMC Neurlogy

 

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This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Voltage-gated Potassium Channel-complex Antibody-associated Limbic Encephalitis

This article discusses antibodies which target the voltage-gated potassium channel complex in the brain. This auto-immune condition effects twice as many men as women, unlike many other auto-immune diseases. It can present with forgetfulness, drowsiness, mood disorders, and generalised or faciobrachial seizures.

The article can be found at http://www.encephalitis.info/information/types-of-encephalitis/types-of-autoimmune-encephalitis/voltage-gated-potassium-channel-complex-antibody-associated-limbic-encephalitis/.

The full text of this article is found at Encephalitis.info and was published in 2014. Copyright © 2014 By Dr Thomas Miller,Clinical Research Fellow, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford

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This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.