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myoclonic epilepsy

PDF Link: Autoantibodies Associated with Diseases of the CNS

Linked is a lengthy PDF article regarding multiple auto-immune diseases affecting the Central Nervous System.

Several CNS disorders associated with specifi c antibodies to ion channels, receptors, and other synaptic proteins have
been recognised over the past 10 years, and can be often successfully treated with immunotherapies. Antibodies to
components of voltage-gated potassium channel complexes (VGKCs), NMDA receptors (NMDARs), AMPA receptors
(AMPARs), GABA type B receptors (GABABRs), and glycine receptors (GlyRs) can be identifi ed in patients and are
associated with various clinical presentations, such as limbic encephalitis and complex and diff use encephalopathies.
These diseases can be associated with tumours, but they are more often non-paraneoplastic, and antibody assays can
help with diagnosis. The new specialty of immunotherapy-responsive CNS disorders is likely to expand further as
more antibody targets are discovered. Recent fi ndings raise many questions about the classifi cation of these diseases,
the relation between antibodies and specifi c clinical phenotypes, the relative pathological roles of serum and intrathecal
antibodies, the mechanisms of autoantibody generation, and the development of optimum treatment strategies.

 

The PDF can be found at Google Articles, published by www.thelancet.com in their August 2011 journal, Volume 10.

Copyright © 2011 The Lancet

 

 

 

 

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Myoclonus

Myoclonus /mˈɒklənəs/ or /məˈklnəs/ is a brief, involuntary twitching of a muscle or a group of muscles. It describes a medical sign and, generally, is not a diagnosis of a disease. These myoclonic twitches, jerks, or seizures are usually caused by sudden muscle contractions (positive myoclonus) or brief lapses of contraction (negative myoclonus). The most common circumstance under which they occur is while falling asleep (hypnic jerk), but myoclonic jerks are also a sign of a number of neurological disorders. Hiccups are also a kind of myoclonic jerk specifically affecting the diaphragm. When a spasm is caused by another person it is known as a “provoked spasm”. Shuddering attacks in babies also fall in this category.

Wikipedia

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Myoclonic Epilepsy

Myoclonic epilepsy refers to a family of epilepsies that present with myoclonus. When myoclonic jerks are occasionally associated with abnormal brain wave activity, it can be categorized as myoclonic seizure. If the abnormal brain wave activity is persistent and results from ongoing seizures, then a diagnosis of myoclonic epilepsy may be considered.

Wikipedia

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.