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Link: High prevalence of NMDA receptor IgA/IgM antibodies in different dementia types

To retrospectively determine the frequency of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR) autoantibodies in patients with different forms of dementia.

This full text discusses the discovery of NMDA antibodies in those with dementias. The text can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/acn3.120/full.

© 2014 The Authors. Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc on behalf of American Neurological Association.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link PDF: Autoantibodies associated with diseases of the CNS: new developments and future challenges

Several CNS disorders associated with specifi c antibodies to ion channels, receptors, and other synaptic proteins have been recognised over the past 10 years, and can be often successfully treated with immunotherapies. Antibodies to components of voltage-gated potassium channel complexes (VGKCs), NMDA receptors (NMDARs), AMPA receptors (AMPARs), GABA type B receptors (GABABRs), and glycine receptors (GlyRs) can be identifi ed in patients and are associated with various clinical presentations, such as limbic encephalitis and complex and diff use encephalopathies. These diseases can be associated with tumours, but they are more often non-paraneoplastic, and antibody assays can help with diagnosis. The new specialty of immunotherapy-responsive CNS disorders is likely to expand further as more antibody targets are discovered. Recent fi ndings raise many questions about the classifi cation of these diseases, the relation between antibodies and specifi c clinical phenotypes, the relative pathological roles of serum and intrathecal antibodies, the mechanisms of autoantibody generation, and the development of optimum treatment strategies.

This article by Angela Vincent, Christian Bien, Sarosh Irani, and Patrick Waters talks about conditions of the CNS caused by autoantibodies. The full paper can be found at ResearchGate.net. This was posted to thread https://www.facebook.com/groups/251477975360/permalink/10154711712105361/ on 27th October, 2014 by G.D.

Copyright © The Lancet 2011 | Authors Angela Vincent, Christian Bien, Sarosh Irani, and Patric Waters

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: MONSTERS INSIDE ME TERRIFYING HUMAN DISEASES

Monsters Inside Me: Ovarian Teratoma

The reason for Kiera Echol’s behaviour is finally diagnosed as an ovarian teratoma, a type of tumour comprising of cells from other organs.

The full video can be found at http://www.discoveryuk.com/web/monsters-inside-me/videos/?video=monsters-inside-me-ovarian-teratoma.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Mystery illness – ovarian teratoma associated encephalitis

A mysterious and often life threatening disease affects the lives of mostly young women. These patients often end up in psychiatric hospitals misdiagnosed or in intensive care units with bizarre behaviour and metabolic meltdown. It’s been discovered that these patients had a benign tumour in the ovary called teratoma. A teratoma can contain teeth, hair and most significantly for the women suffering from this condition, brain tissue. The body sees this tumour like a foreign type of tissue and mounts an attack, an immune response against these brain cells that are in the tumour. However, the immunological system is tricked and not only goes against the tumour, but is also misdirected against the brain of the patients.

The full audio can be heard at http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2011/06/hrt_20110606_0830.mp3.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Norwich man reveals his ‘horrendous’ battle with rare autoimmune disease

A Norwich man today told how he ended up in a mental health unit and attempted suicide because of a disease so rare it took months for doctors to diagnose.

The full article can be found at http://www.edp24.co.uk/.

 

Copyright © EDP24 January 2015 | by Tom Bristow

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Catatonia: A Duel of Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy and Anti NMDA Receptor Encephalitis (P5.166)

OBJECTIVE

To present a unique case of diagnostic conundrum in a catatonic patient positive for both anti NMDA receptor and anti TPO antibodies with a normal 24 hour EEG, brain MRI and CSF.BACKGROUND:Catatonia, although typically associated with schizophrenia and other affective disorders, can be an uncommon presenting feature of two rare neurologic disorders: Hashimoto’s encephalopathy and anti NMDA receptor encephalitis. Here we describe a case of anti NMDA receptor encephalitis in a catatonic patient positive for both anti TPO and anti NMDA receptor antibodies with a negative 24 hour EEG, normal brain MRI and CSF

The abstract can be found at http://www.neurology.org/content/82/10_Supplement/P5.166.short. The full study may be obtained from the American Academy of Neurlogy; however, we could not find the article elsewhere online at this time.

 

Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Neurology

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: NMDA receptor antibodies associated with distinct white matter syndromes

Objective: To report the clinical and radiologic findings of children with NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies and white matter disorders.

This was posted by G.D. on 26th November, 2014. The full text can be found at http://nn.neurology.org/content/1/1/e2.full.

 

Copyright ©  April 24, 2014 |by Yael Hacohen, MRCPCH, et al.

Published in Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm June 2014 vol. 1 no. 1 e2

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Types Of Autoimmune Encephalitis

Autoimmune Encephalitis may be triggered by infection in which case the term “Post-infectious Encephalitis” is used. ADEM( Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis ) is a Post-infectious Encephalitis. The illness usually follows in the wake of a mild viral infection (such as those that cause rashes in childhood) or immunisations. Typically there is a delay of days to two to three weeks between the triggering infection and development of the Encephalitis.

This link will lead you to a variety of auto-immuned encephalopathies and more information about each.

 

Copyright © The Encephalitis Society

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Video: Arun Venkatesan – Acute Encephalitis: Prognostic Factors and Novel Therapies

This video from the AE Alliance Vimeo page features a presentation by Arun Venkatesan from John Hoppkins on acute encephalitis.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Human N-methyl D-aspartate receptor antibodies alter memory and behaviour in mice

Anti-N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder that associates with prominent memory and behavioural deficits. Patients’ antibodies react with the N-terminal domain of the GluN1 (previously known as NR1) subunit of NMDAR causing in cultured neurons a selective and reversible internalization of cell-surface receptors. –

 

This was shared by G.D. on 25th November, 2014. To read the full text, proceed to http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2014/11/11/brain.awu310.

The full text of this article is found at Oxford University Press and was published in May of 2011. Copyright © 2014 Oxford University Press

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.