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Link: Hashimoto’s Disease: The Danger of Thyroid Antibodies and Pregnancy

By testing TSH alone, thyroid antibodies in Hashimoto’s may be missed, and your doctor may have no idea your baby is at risk.

Consider for a moment the number of babies lost to Hashimoto’s disease just because doctors fail to perform a simple blood test. Hashimoto’s is confirmed by lab tests for these two antibodies. If your doctor refuses to do these two tests, you have the option to order your own lab tests. Here is a Hashimoto’s thyroid panel for U.S. residents and here is thyroid testing including antibodiesavailable in Europe:

  1. Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (TPOAb)
  2. Thyroglobulin Antibodies (TgAb)

The full blog article about thyroid antibodies and pregnancy can be found at http://hypothyroidmom.com/hashimotos-disease-the-danger-of-thyroid-antibodies-and-pregnancy/.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: UK Guidelines for the Use of Thyroid Function Tests

Purpose of the guidelines

It is hoped that the document will provide guidance for primary care physicians, specialist physicians, endocrinologists, and clinical biochemists. The accompanying patient information sets have been especially designed to explain thyroid function testing and to summarise the main recommendations in the guidelines in everyday language. The purpose of the guidelines is to encourage a greater understanding of thyroid function testing amongst all stakeholders with a view to the widespread adoption of harmonised good practice in the diagnosis and management of patients with thyroid disorders. The guidelines are also intended to provide a basis for local and national audit and each section offers recommendations that are suitable for the audit process. The document should be considered as guidelines only; it is not intended to serve as a standard of medical care. The doctors concerned must make the management plan for an individual patient. The focus of the document is thyroid function testing, and it is not intended to be a comprehensive text on thyroid disorders.

 

This guide may be of particular interest to women who wish to get pregnant and who also have been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy, or who have a family history of thyroid disease, or women who are currently in the early stages of pregnancy. The full document can be found at  http://www.british-thyroid-association.org/info-for-patients/Docs/TFT_guideline_final_version_July_2006.pdf

Copyright © The British thyroid Association 2006

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Cosleeping and Biological Imperatives: Why Human Babies Do Not and Should Not Sleep Alone

This article discusses the neurological impact of “co-sleeping” on infants.

Where a baby sleeps is not as simple as current medical discourse and recommendations against cosleeping in some western societies want it to be. And there is good reason why. I write here to explain why the pediatric recommendations on forms of cosleeping such as bedsharing will and should remain mixed. I will also address why the majority of new parents practice intermittent bedsharing despite governmental and medical warnings against it.

 

The full article can be found at the Neuroanthropology.net website.

 

Copyright © December 21st, 2008 | by James J McKenna, Ph. D

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: What Happens to a Woman’s Brain When She Becomes a Mother

From joy and attachment to anxiety and protectiveness, mothering behavior begins with biochemical reactions.

The full article, which discusses the neurological changes that occur during pregnancy and after, can be found at http://www.theatlantic.com/.

 

Copyright © 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.