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Video: The Marketing of Madness: The Truth About Psychotropic Drugs

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Link: What is AE?

What other medications are commonly prescribed to patients with AE? Are there any medications that specifically should not be taken by someone suffering from AE?

Treatment of symptoms – in particular agitation and sleeplessness, using benzodiazepines is common and appropriate. High-dose Lorazepam (trademark: Ativan) is highly effective for AE patients.

Note that because of the completely different disease mechanism, use of anti-psychotic drugs commonly used to treat bipolar disorder and schizophrenia such as Clozapine (Clozaril) and Risperidone (Risperidal) may not be effective, and may actually increase the severity of AE symptoms.

Because individuals with undiagnosed AE are commonly misdiagnosed as having bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, clinicians and families should be alert to possible deterioration or severe negative reactions in patients receiving this class of drugs.

Failure to respond to anti-psychotics can be a diagnostic clue that the actual cause of psychosis may be autoimmune encephalitis.

 

This page on AEAlliance.org shares some frequently asked questions on Autoimmune Encephalopathy. Particularly of interest is the above section and more about psychiatric manifestations in AE patients.

 

The full post can be found at https://aealliance.org/faq/#what-is-ae.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Autoimmune encephalitis: a case series and comprehensive review of the literature

Encephalitic syndromes are a common medical emergency. The importance of early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is paramount. If initial investigations for infectious agents prove negative, other diagnoses must be considered promptly. Autoimmune encephalitides are being increasingly recognized as important (and potentially reversible) non-infectious causes of an encephalitic syndrome. We describe four patients with autoimmune encephalitis—3 auto-antibody positive, 1 auto-antibody negative—treated during the last 18 months. A comprehensive review of the literature in this expanding area will be of interest to the infectious diseases, general medical and neurology community.

 

http://qjmed.oxfordjournals.org/content/104/11/921.long

Copyright © 2011 Association of Physicians of Great Britain and Ireland | Authors T. Wingfield , C. Mchugh , A. Vas , A. Richardson , E. Wilkins , A. Bonington , A. Varma

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s Encephalitis by by Dr. Sarosh Irani, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford

 Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy (HE) was first described in 1966. It is a rare condition, which is probably of autoimmune origin. Autoimmunity describes disorders in which the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys the body’s tissues. HE is usually defined by the presence of high levels of thyroid antibodies in the blood.  HE has been reported in all age groups but typically affects females of around 50 years of age. – The Encephalitis Society

To read the full text, proceed to http://www.encephalitis.info/information/types-of-encephalitis/types-of-autoimmune-encephalitis/hashimoto-s-encephalitis/

The full text of this article is found at Encephalitis Society. Copyright  © March 17th 2014 Dr. Sarosh Irani, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford

This link was posted by G.D. on 18th November to this thread – https://www.facebook.com/groups/564512313648230/permalink/588191237947004/.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Video: Psychogenic Myoclonus

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Voltage-gated Potassium Channel-complex Antibody-associated Limbic Encephalitis

This article discusses antibodies which target the voltage-gated potassium channel complex in the brain. This auto-immune condition effects twice as many men as women, unlike many other auto-immune diseases. It can present with forgetfulness, drowsiness, mood disorders, and generalised or faciobrachial seizures.

The article can be found at http://www.encephalitis.info/information/types-of-encephalitis/types-of-autoimmune-encephalitis/voltage-gated-potassium-channel-complex-antibody-associated-limbic-encephalitis/.

The full text of this article is found at Encephalitis.info and was published in 2014. Copyright © 2014 By Dr Thomas Miller,Clinical Research Fellow, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford

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This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy Cases: Chinese Experience

This study discusses Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy and it’s presentation of multiple neurologic symptoms and high anti-body titer. It specifically focuses on the Chinese population but may be of some interest for the purpose of personal research.

 

The full text of this article is found at BMC Neurology. Copyright © 2012 Tang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

 

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This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.