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Link: Complications of Hyperthyroidism

Introduction

Some clinical views which appear during hyperthyroidism can be called complications of hyperthyroidism. These clinical events are as follows. 1. Thyrotoxic heart disease 2. Progressive infiltrative ophtalmopathy in hyperthyroidism 3. Hyperthyroidism and bone 4. Thyroid chrisis 5. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis 6. Thyrotoxicosis related psychosis and convulsion 7. Thyrotoxicosis related diabetes mellitus

The full text PDF can be found at http://cdn.intechopen.com/pdfs-wm/46631.pdf.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimotos Encephalopathy – A Reversible Cause of Dementia

A form of potentially reversible Autoimmune Dementia, Steroid Response Encephalopathy Associated With Autoimmune Thyroiditis (SREAT), also known as Hashimoto Encephalopathy (HE) is characterised by confusion with or without myoclonus, seizures, hyperreflexia, and psychosis.

Presentation may be an insidious development of cognitive impairment or recurrent acute episodes of focal neurological deficit with confusion (can present acutely with multiple recurrent focal neurological events or with a progressive, diffuse pattern characterized by cognitive impairment). It is under-recognized by physicians.

 

The full article can be found at http://www.thedementiacure.com/hashimotos-encephalopathy-a-reversible-cause-of-dementia/.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: The epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis.

This review summarizes the epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis. The associations between autoimmune diseases and psychosis have been studied for more than a half century, but research has intensified within the last decades, since psychosis has been associated with genetic markers of the immune system and with excess autoreactivity and other immune alterations. A range of psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, have been observed to occur more frequently in some autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis.

 

The full text could not be found but the abstract can be read at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24199668.

Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Hashimoto’s encephalopathy mimicking presenile dementia

Abstract

Hashimoto’s encephalopathy (HE), which carries kaleidoscopic clinical presentations, is easily misdiagnosed in clinical practice. Early diagnosis and prompt initiation of steroid therapy are associated with good prognosis. We describe a 50-year-old female patient who had subclinical hypothyroidism and who presented herself with gradual cognitive impairment, accompanied with auditory hallucination and delusion. Increased anti-thyroid antibodies titers were found in her serum and cerebrospinal fluid. The HE diagnosis was confirmed using the laboratory test for anti-thyroid antibodies along with the patient’s clinical presentation. We treated her with steroid pulse therapy, and the results were favorable. We highlight this case to call for early diagnosis and prompt intervention of HE in clinical practice.

The full text can be purchased from Science Direct. This study was published in General Hospital Psychiatry.

 

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. | General Hospital Psychiatry Volume 36, May/June 2014, Page 360

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

PDF Link: Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy Presenting as Acute Psychosis

Abstract:

Hashimoto’s encephalopathy is a relapsing encephalopathy occurring in association with
Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, with high titers of anti-thyroid antibodies. Clinically the patients may presents with acute or
subacute encephalopathy, seizure, myoclonus, and tremulousness, stroke like episode, amnesia or dementia. Here
we are reporting a case of hashimoto’s encephalopathy who presented with features of acute psychosis.

The full study can be found at http://omicsgroup.org/journals/hashimotos-encephalopathy-presenting-as-acute-psychosis-ijn-1000131.pdf. This will open a PDF of the study.

Copyright © Rameshwar Nath Chaurasia and Vijay Mishra Associate Professor, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Neurology, India

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Link: Central nervous system neuronal surface antibody associated syndromes: review and guidelines for recognition

The concept of antibody mediated CNS disorders is relatively recent. The classical CNS paraneoplastic neurological syndromes are thought to be T cell mediated, and the onconeural antibodies merely biomarkers for the presence of the tumour. Thus it was thought that antibodies rarely, if ever, cause CNS disease. Over the past 10 years, identification of autoimmune forms of encephalitis with antibodies against neuronal surface antigens, particularly the voltage gated potassium channel complex proteins or the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, have shown that CNS disorders, often without associated tumours, can be antibody mediated and benefit from immunomodulatory therapies. The clinical spectrum of these diseases is not yet fully explored, there may be others yet to be discovered and some types of more common disorders (eg, epilepsy or psychosis) may prove to have an autoimmune basis. Here, the known conditions associated with neuronal surface antibodies are briefly reviewed, some general aspects of these syndromes are considered and guidelines that could help in the recognition of further disorders are suggested.

The full article can be read here – https://www.scienceopen.com/document_file/3c3c5aae-83d2-454d-8f94-d575da463f5a/PubMedCentral/3c3c5aae-83d2-454d-8f94-d575da463f5a.pdf.

 

Copyright © BMJ Publishing 2011 | by Luigi Zuliani,Francesc Graus, Bruno Giometto, Christian Bien, and Angela Vincent

 

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Video: AutoImmune Encephalitis: Common Symptoms and Diagnostic Workup

An excellent technical video (caution: jargon heavy) which discusses Anti-NMDAR Encephalitis and it’s diagnosis and tretament. Highly recommended viewing for those who are pending a diagnosis of Autoimmune Encephalopathy of any kind as this provides some good information.

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.

Video: Autoimmune Encephalitis: Patient Perspective

This video has been posted by Autoimmune Encephalitis Alliance to their YouTube.com channel. This video features Susanna Cahalan reading excerpts from her book, Brain on Fire.

Shared by G.D. in this post on 23rd October, 2014.

 

This website is not a substitute for independent professional advice. Nothing contained in this site is intended to be used as medical advice. No articles, personal accounts, or other content are intended to be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes or as a substitute for your own health professionals advice.